Pieces in the Harvard Art Museum's collection from 1800 to today.

The Harvard Art Museum, with its vast collection of works, serves as an ideal teaching tool for students, however, its very strength in size presents a daunting task when it comes to visualizing its capabilities.

Ever wondered what regions are the root to saturations of art? Curious about how to anchor pieces by time and compare them with one another? Have you ever thought about finding works by their predominant color?

Scratch your head no more! Our website presents users with three visual tools to peruse the Harvard Art Museum's collection in an interactive, colorful, and digestible way!




Explore Art by Region

Zoom into the map to explore art by location. Click on a cluster to see all of the art pieces in the collection created in that place. Click the dots to view art and add it to your gallery.



Explore Art by Century

Brush the top timeline to explore a time period of interest. Use the drop down boxes to filter by medium. Click the dots to view art and add it to your gallery.
All Paintings Prints Drawings Photographs Sculpture Other



Explore Art by Color

Move through the color spectrum to view art pieces by predominant color value. Click on a bar to view art and add it to your gallery.

Red

Orange

Yellow

Green

Blue




Meet Our Team

Katherine Harrison

Sophomore, Winthrop House
Katherine studies computational and cognitive
neuroscience with a secondary in computer science.
She has a blog, ivykat.squarespace.com, where
she shares her love for fashion, food, and photography, and writes about other beautiful things in the world around her.

Maria McLaughlin

Junior, Dunster House
Maria studies computer science.
In her spare time, she teaches
computer science to middle-schoolers
and plans events for her sorority sisters.

Maia Suazo-Maler

Sophomore, Winthrop House
Maia jointly studies the history of art and architecture
and computer science. She serves as a student board member for the Harvard Art Museums. She has a blog,
modandbean.com, where she shares her passion for photography, people, and parlance.